Evaluate: appraise, argue, assess, compare and con

Evaluate: appraise, argue, assess, compare and contrast, justify, interpret, reframe, support and defend

The primary theme of the paper is Evaluate: appraise, argue, assess, compare and contrast, justify, interpret, reframe, support and defend in which you are required to emphasize its aspects in detail. The cost of the paper starts from $99 and it has been purchased and rated 4.9 points on the scale of 5 points by the students. To gain deeper insights into the paper and achieve fresh information, kindly contact our support.

What is a literature review?

A literature review is an important part of your project report. It should be approximately 1,300 words. It will be a result of your reading about your topic. You should introduce your topic, say why it is important, and provide your reader with a reasonably in-depth account of what research has been conducted in this topic, and what it has found. It is important that you keep an open mind when reading and writing your literature review. If you find two different theories or two different pieces of research that contradict each other, talk about both of them! To get the high grades here you will need to analyse and evaluate all that you read for instance:

Analyse: compare, contrast, examine

Evaluate: appraise, argue, assess, compare and contrast, justify, interpret, reframe, support and defend

The literature review is essentially providing your reader with sufficient information to prepare them for your research question. Your research question should be based on what you read about your topic and should say what it is that you wish to find out. For instance, if you want to find out what the general public know about the symptoms and features of dementia, I might have a research question that goes something like this: are the general public aware of the symptoms and features of dementia? The aim of the study will be: to find out what the general public know about the symptoms and features of dementia. So, the research question is telling your reader what you want to find out in the form of a question. The aim of the study is what you set out to do or find out.

Next comes the Hypothesis. This is your prediction of what you anticipate to find. It may be about the general population (it was hypothesised that the general public would have a poor understanding of the symptoms and features of dementia) or it can be directed at different groups of people (it was hypothesised that women would understand the features and symptoms of dementia better than men would).

 

Use some these resources listed below and provide evidence of them by providing copies of the parts of the books used or journals.

British Medical Journal – Deliberate self-harm in Adolescent.

Self-mutilation: Theory, research and treatment – BW Walsh

Cutting: Understanding and Overcoming self-mutilation – Steven Levenkron.

A history of self-harm in Britain – Chris Millard.

Responding to self-harm in children and adolescents – Steven Walker

Sage Journal Making sense of an unknown terrain –  Nicholas D, et al –

Self-harm – The path to Recovery – Kate Middleton

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