1. Discuss the product family in its socio-economi

1. Discuss the product family in its socio-economic and consumerist context;

The primary theme of the paper is 1. Discuss the product family in its socio-economic and consumerist context; in which you are required to emphasize its aspects in detail. The cost of the paper starts from $99 and it has been purchased and rated 4.9 points on the scale of 5 points by the students. To gain deeper insights into the paper and achieve fresh information, kindly contact our support.

Sustainable Production and Consumption of Mobile Phones

INSTRUCTIONS:

I understand its extensive instruction but please make time to read it all carefully. Its a poster but I want you to help me write it and will put the details on A1 paper as a poster myself. Use diagrams, arrows, and other graphics to explain and direct attention rather than too much text.

Coherent structure (well organised and easy to follow); clear concise title and summary; visually appealing with excellent balance of effective text and original graphics that synthesise information from an extensive range of sources; graphics are self-explanatory or fully explained in accompanying text; extensive references with correct use of the Harvard referencing system throughout; all design guidance adhered to.

In this assignment life cycle thinking must be applied to critically evaluate the sustainability of a consumer product. Producer, retailer and consumer responsibility should be considered. You must select one of these product families: Personal Electronic Devices or High Street Fashion as the focus of the assignment. For the product family that you selected you have to:


1. Discuss the product family in its socio-economic and consumerist context;

2. Apply life cycle thinking to evaluate the sustainability impacts of the production and consumption and explain the implications of these impacts;

3. Critically evaluate current (un) sustainable practice in the production and consumption of the product family;

4. Make appropriate recommendation(s) regarding how the sustainability of the product family could be improved, identifying any potential challenges and how they might be overcome.

The focus of your poster:

Your poster must apply life cycle thinking to examine the sustainability of one of the following product families:

1. Personal electronic devices (PEDs): electronic equipment that is small and easy to carry (e.g. mobile phones, mp3 players, tablets, laptops, etc.)

OR

2. High street fashion: fashion geared to meet the requirements of, and readily available for purchase by, the general public (e.g. fashion items for sale via high street or on-line retailers such as ASOS, Department Stores, H&M, M&S, Top Shop, Very, etc.)


It is your choice whether you focus on:

• The general product family (e.g. looking broadly at PEDs or high street fashion)

• A particular type of product within the product family (e.g. looking at mobile phones within PEDs or t-shirts within high street fashion)

• A case study of a specific producer or retailer (e.g. Apple or H&M)

• A comparative analysis of two or more competing producers or retailers (e.g. Apple and Samsung or H&M and M&S). 

• A case study of a specific product (e.g. an iPhone or Nike trainers)

• A comparative analysis of two or more competing products (e.g. comparing an iPhone and a Samsung Galaxy phone or Nike and PUMA trainers).



It is also your choice whether you focus on:

• Overall sustainability, including governance, economic, environmental and social sustainability.

• A particular aspect or aspects of sustainability: for example, you may choose to focus on environmental sustainability or social sustainability or both environmental and social sustainability.



In all cases:

• You should provide a rationale for your focus 

• You should address both producer/retailer and consumer responsibility and behaviour.

• The level of detail presented in your analysis should be commensurate with your selected level of focus (from general to specific). 

Your poster should include the following: 


A succinct title that clearly identifies the focus of your poster (Marking Criterion 1).


A summary that provides an overview of the key findings of your analysis (Marking Criterion 1). This may be positioned at either the beginning (as an abstract) or the end of your poster.


An introduction that clearly states the focus of your poster, provides a rationale for your focus, and places the selected product(s) (family, type, or specific) within its socio-economic and consumerist context (Marking Criterion 2). 


A section that presents an analysis of the sustainability impacts across the full life cycle of the product(s) (family, type or specific), including consideration of the implications of these impacts (Marking Criterion 3). 

A section that critically evaluates current practice in the (un)sustainable production and consumption of the product (family, type or specific) (Marking Criterion 4). 

A section that makes appropriate recommendation(s) regarding how the sustainability of the product (family, type or specific) could be improved, identifying any potential challenges and how they might be overcome (Marking Criterion 5). 

A reference list in the Harvard referencing style (Marking Criterion 1).


In identifying and considering the implications of life cycle impacts, evaluating current practice, and making recommendations for improvement, you could consider issues such as government policy, public relations, brand image, marketing, financial or environmental costs and benefits, human rights, technological resources, organisational structures and processes, organisational cultures and models of business, or consumer behaviour. Please note this is neither a prescriptive nor an exhaustive list.

The design of your poster

Your poster should be clearly organised and easy to follow. It should also be visually appealing with an appropriate balance of effective text and original graphics (figures, tables, schematics etc.). You should present as much information as possible in graphical form, with ~50% of the space occupied by main body text. Note that at the required font size of 20-24 point this equates to around 550-800 words of main body text. You should also adhere to the design guidance given below (Marking Criterion 1). 

• A1 in size (either portrait or landscape orientation)

• Include your student ID number but NOT your name

• Prepared using an appropriate software package (e.g. PowerPoint or CorelDraw)

• The poster title, section headings and sub-section headings should be in bold font and may employ either a sans serif (e.g. Arial, Calibri) or serif typeface (e.g. Times New Roman, Garamond). The poster title should be in 72 point, section headings should be a minimum of 36 point, and sub-section headings a minimum of 24 point.

• The main body text should be a sans serif typeface (e.g. Arial, Calibri) in 20 to 24 point and left justified. 

• The reference list text may be either a sans serif or serif typeface and should be a minimum of 14 point. 

• Use bold type for emphasis sparingly. Only use italics where required (e.g. latin terms, and as required in Harvard referencing). Avoid using shadow or 3-D effects on either text or figures. Do not underline any text. 

CONTENT:

Sustainable Production and Consumption of Mobile Phones Student: Professor: Course title: Date: Sustainable Production and Consumption of Mobile Phones This poster applies life cycle thinking to critically evaluate the sustainability of a mobile phone, which is a consumer product. Producer, retailer, as well as consumer responsibility are taken into consideration.  Many people rarely consider where the products they utilize everyday originate from, or what actually happens to them when the user has finished using them. Every product that people use impacts the environment (Exelby 2008, p. 6).  Kooser (2009, p. 37) stated that the same way as living things are born, age and eventually pass away, products also complete a life cycle. Each phase of the lifecycle of a product can affect the environment in various ways. Mobile phone products have many dissimilar parts and each of these parts has its own lifecycle over and above the composite product’s life cycle (Rocha 2014, p. 71). The Personal Electronic Devices (PED) product – mobile phone Today, having a mobile phone has become as common as owning a traditional landline telephone at home. Mobile phones have currently become a necessity of daily life – people utilize them to get directions when they are lost, call home whenever they are late, or make plans with friends (Soo & Doolan 2014, p. 263). Many people actually never think about how mobile phones are produced and what really happen...

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